During the lockdown of 2020/2021
I decided to create my own

RETRO ROOM

With all the issues of lockdown, not being able to do the normal things and with 24 hours a day doom and gloom and everyone thinking they know what’s right for us all, I decided not to watch the news anymore and create somewhere that took me back to happier times where life was less complicated, people looked out for one another and we all felt alot safer.

My RETRO ROOM project consisted of computers and systems that reminded me of my youth and systems that I have previously owned and ones that had a significant impact on my life growing up.

Apart from nostalgia, they marked important milestones in my life and bring me alot of happy memories as well as reminding me of lost skills and how diverse my knowledge and skill base was as we have grown into an Apple vs everyone else world. 

Released between 1980 – 1985

Commodore VIC-20

The Commodore VIC-20 is an 8-bit home computer that was sold by Commodore Business Machines.

 

The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore’s first personal computer, the PET.

learn more

Released between 1984 – 1985

Commodore 16

The Commodore 16 is a home computer made by Commodore International with a 6502-compatible
7501 or 8501 CPU, released in 1984.

 

The C16 belong to the same family as the higher-end Plus/4 and are internally very similar to it (albeit with less RAM – 16 rather than 64 KB – and lacking the Plus/4’s user port and Three plus one software).

learn more

Released between 1982 – 1994

Commodore 64

This original Commodore 64 known as the breadbin model is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International.

 

The Commodore 64 had three different Kernal ROM versions, two different SID sound chip versions, a few different motherboard versions and two different cases during its lifetime.

learn more

Released between 1987 – 1991

Amiga 500 Plus

The Commodore Amiga 500 Plus (or simply A500+) is an enhanced version of the original Amiga 500 computer.

 

It was notable for introducing new versions of Kickstart and Workbench, and for some minor improvements in the custom chips, known as the Enhanced Chip Set (or ECS).

learn more

Released between 1987 – 1991

Amiga 2000

The Amiga 2000 is a personal computer released by Commodore in March 1987.

 

Expansion capabilities include two 3.5″ drive bays (one of which is used by the included floppy drive) and one 5.25″ bay that can be used by a 5.25″ floppy drive (for IBM PC compatibility), a hard drive, or CD-ROM once they became available.

learn more

Released between 1992 – 1996

Amiga 1200

The A1200 offers a number of advantages over earlier models. Specifically, it is a 32-bit design;
the 68EC020 microprocessor is faster than
the 68000 and has 2 MB of RAM as standard.

 

The AGA chipset used in the A1200 is a significant improvement. AGA increases the color palette from 4096 colors to 16.8 million colors with up to 256 on-screen colors normally, and an improved HAM mode allowing 262,144 on-screen colors. The graphics hardware also features improved sprite capacity and faster graphics performance mainly due to faster video memory.

learn more

Released between 1981 – 1994

BBC Model B

The British Broadcasting Corporation Microcomputer System, or BBC Micro, is a series of microcomputers and associated peripherals designed and built by the Acorn Computer company in the 1980s for the BBC Computer Literacy Project, operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation.

 

Designed with an emphasis on education, it was notable for its ruggedness, expandability, and the quality of its operating system.

learn more

Released between 1985 – 1998

Amstrad PCW 8256

The Amstrad PCW series is a range of personal computers produced by British company Amstrad from 1985 to 1998.

 

All models except the last included the Locoscript word processing program, the CP/M Plus operating system, Mallard BASIC and the LOGO programming language at no extra cost.

learn more

Released between 1986 – 1987

Atari 2600 Woody

The Atari 2600, originally branded as the Atari Video Computer System until November 1982, is a home video game console developed and produced by Atari, Inc.

 

The original Atari 2600 woody released on September 11, 1977, it is credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor-based hardware and games stored on ROM cartridges

 

learn more

Released between 1982 – 1992

ZX Spectrum 48k

The ZX Spectrum is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research.

 

It was launched as the ZX Spectrum by Sinclair
to highlight the machine’s colour display.

 

The Spectrum was released as eight different models, ranging from the entry level with 16 KB RAM released in
1982 to the ZX Spectrum +3 with 128 KB RAM
and built in floppy disk drive in 1987.

learn more

Released between 1991 – 1993

Apple Mac Classic II

The Macintosh Classic II is a personal computer designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer, Inc. from October 1991 to September 1993.

 

The Classic II was powered by a 16 MHz Motorola 68030 CPU and 40 or 80 MB hard disk.

 

The Classic II is the last black-and-white compact Macintosh, and the last desktop Macintosh to include an external floppy disk drive port. 

learn more

Released between 2018 – 2021

The C64

The C64 is back, this time full-sized with a working keyboard for the dedicated retro home-computer fan. Featuring three switchable modes – C64, VIC 20, and Games Carousel.

 

Connect to any modern TV via HDMI for crisp 720p HD visuals, at 60 Hz or 50 Hz. An updated joystick, now featuring micro switches, companions the hardware making the included games even more fun than ever.

learn more

Retro Room 2020 / 2021

My Retro Room

In December 2020 I decided to build my retro room and fill it with all the systems that I had used in my lifetime and especially the ones who influenced my journey into the computer industry.

 

The room is now finished and brings me a huge amount of pleasure taking me back to better days and I have enjoyed both building the room and future proofing the technology so it can live on for many more years.

learn more

During the lockdown of 2020/2021
I decided to create my own

RETRO ROOM

With all the issues of lockdown, not being able to do the normal things and with 24 hours a day doom and gloom and everyone thinking they know what’s right for us all, I decided not to watch the news anymore and create somewhere that took me back to happier times where life was less complicated, people looked out for one another and we all felt alot safer.

My RETRO ROOM project consisted of computers and systems that reminded me of my youth and systems that I have previously owned and ones that had a significant impact on my life growing up.

Apart from nostalgia, they marked important milestones in my life and bring me alot of happy memories as well as reminding me of lost skills and how diverse my knowledge and skill base was as we have grown into an Apple vs everyone else world.

Commodore VIC-20

1980 - 1985

The Commodore VIC-20 is an 8-bit home computer that was sold by Commodore Business Machines.

 

The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore’s first personal computer, the PET.

learn more

Commodore 16

1984 - 1985

The Commodore 16 is a home computer made by Commodore International with a 6502-compatible 7501 or 8501 CPU, released in 1984.

 

The C16 belong to the same family as the higher-end Plus/4 and are internally very similar to it (albeit with less RAM – 16 rather than 64 KB – and lacking the Plus/4’s user port and Three plus one software).

learn more

Commodore 64

1982 - 1994

This original Commodore 64 known as the breadbin model is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International.

 

The Commodore 64 had three different Kernal ROM versions, two different SID sound chip versions, a few different motherboard versions and two different cases during its lifetime.

learn more

Amiga 500 Plus

1987 - 1991

The Commodore Amiga 500 Plus (or simply A500+) is an enhanced version of the original Amiga 500 computer.

 

It was notable for introducing new versions of Kickstart and Workbench, and for some minor improvements in the custom chips, known as the Enhanced Chip Set (or ECS).

learn more

Amiga 2000

1987 - 1991

The Amiga 2000 is a personal computer released by Commodore in March 1987.

 

Expansion capabilities include two 3.5″ drive bays (one of which is used by the included floppy drive) and one 5.25″ bay that can be used by a 5.25″ floppy drive (for IBM PC compatibility), a hard drive, or CD-ROM once they became available.

learn more

Amiga 1200

1992 - 1996

The A1200 offers a number of advantages over earlier models. Specifically, it is a 32-bit design; the 68EC020 microprocessor is faster than the 68000 and has 2 MB of RAM as standard.

 

The AGA chipset used in the A1200 is a significant improvement. AGA increases the color palette from 4096 colors to 16.8 million colors with up to 256 on-screen colors normally, and an improved HAM mode allowing 262,144 on-screen colors. The graphics hardware also features improved sprite capacity and faster graphics performance mainly due to faster video memory. 

learn more

BBC Model B

1981 - 1994

The British Broadcasting Corporation Microcomputer System, or BBC Micro, is a series of microcomputers and associated peripherals designed and built by the Acorn Computer company in the 1980s for the BBC Computer Literacy Project, operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation.

 

Designed with an emphasis on education, it was notable for its ruggedness, expandability, and the quality of its operating system.

learn more

Amstrad PCW 8256

1985 - 1998

The Amstrad PCW series is a range of personal computers produced by British company Amstrad from 1985 to 1998.

 

All models except the last included the Locoscript word processing program, the CP/M Plus operating system, Mallard BASIC and the LOGO programming language at no extra cost.

learn more

Atari 2600 Woody

1986 - 1987

The Atari 2600, originally branded as the Atari Video Computer System until November 1982, is a home video game console developed and produced by Atari, Inc.

 

The original Atari 2600 woody released on September 11, 1977, it is credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor-based hardware and games stored on ROM cartridges

 

learn more

Apple Mac Classic II

1991 - 1993

The Macintosh Classic II is a personal computer designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer, Inc. from October 1991 to September 1993.

 

The Classic II was powered by a 16 MHz Motorola 68030 CPU and 40 or 80 MB hard disk.

 

The Classic II is the last black-and-white compact Macintosh, and the last desktop Macintosh to include an external floppy disk drive port.

learn more

ZX Spectrum 48k

1982 - 1992

The ZX Spectrum is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research.

 

It was launched as the ZX Spectrum by Sinclair to highlight the machine’s colour display.

 

The Spectrum was released as eight different models, ranging from the entry level with 16 KB RAM released in 1982 to the ZX Spectrum +3 with 128 KB RAM and built in floppy disk drive in 1987.

learn more

The C64

2018 - 2021

The C64 is back, this time full-sized with a working keyboard for the dedicated retro home-computer fan. Featuring three switchable modes – C64, VIC 20, and Games Carousel.

 

Connect to any modern TV via HDMI for crisp 720p HD visuals, at 60 Hz or 50 Hz. An updated joystick, now featuring micro switches, companions the hardware making the included games even more fun than ever.

learn more

My Retro Room

2020 / 2021

In December 2020 I decided to build my retro room and fill it with all the systems that I had used in my lifetime and especially the ones who influenced my journey into the computer industry.

 

The room is now finished and brings me a huge amount of pleasure taking me back to better days and I have enjoyed both building the room and future proofing the technology so it can live on for many more years.

learn more